This unit is assessed by a Pearson-set assignment. The project brief will be set bythe centre, based on a theme provided by Pearson (this will change annually). Thetheme and chosen project within the theme will enable students to explore andexamine a relevant and current topical aspect of computing in the context of a business environment.

In order to ensure that client expectations are met in terms of requirements, deadlines and the estimated cost, the work to deliver new computer systems or services to business organisations, or to revamp the existing ones, is always organised in projects. Therefore, skilful, knowledgeable and experienced project managers have always been in demand. It is projected that 15.7 million new project management roles will be created around the world by 2020.

The aim of this unit is to offer students an opportunity to demonstrate the skills required for managing and implementing a project. They will undertake independent research and investigation for carrying out and executing a computing project which meets appropriate aims and objectives.

On successful completion of this unit students will have the confidence to engage in decision-making, problem-solving and research activities using project management skills. They will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to enable them to investigate and examine relevant computing concepts within a work-related context, determine appropriate outcomes, decisions or solutions and present evidence to various stakeholders in an acceptable and understandable format.

In 1837 English mathematicians Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace collaboratively described a machine that could perform arithmetical operations and store data within memory units. This design of their ‘Analytical Engine’ is the first representation of modern, general-purpose computer technology. Although moderncomputers have advanced far beyond Babbage and Lovelace’s initial proposal, they are still fundamentally relying on mathematics for their design and operation.

This unit introduces students to the mathematical principles and theory that underpin the computing curriculum. Through a series of case studies, scenarios and task-based assessments students will explore number theory within a variety of scenarios; use applicable probability theory; apply geometrical and vector methodology; and finally evaluate problems concerning differential and integral calculus.

Among the topics included in this unit are: prime number theory, sequences and series, probability theory, geometry, differential calculus and integral calculus.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to gain confidence with the relevant mathematics needed within other computing units. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing

Security is one of the most important challenges modern organisations face.

Security is about protecting organisational assets, including personnel, data,

equipment and networks from attack through the use of prevention techniques in

the form of vulnerability testing/security policies and detection techniques,

exposing breaches in security and implementing effective responses.

The aim of this unit is to provide students with knowledge of security, associated

risks and how security breaches impact on business continuity. Students will

examine security measures involving access authorisation, regulation of use,

implementing contingency plans and devising security policies and procedures.

This unit introduces students to the detection of threats and vulnerabilities in

physical and IT security, and how to manage risks relating to organisational

security.

Among the topics included in this unit are Network Security design and operational

topics, including address translation, DMZ, VPN, firewalls, AV and intrusion

detection systems. Remote access will be covered, as will the need for frequent

vulnerability testing as part of organisational and security audit compliance.

Students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking,

analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment

and developing academic competence.

Organisations depend on their databases to provide information essential for their

day-to-day operations and to help them take advantage of today's rapidly growing

and maturing e-commerce opportunities. An understanding of database tools and

technologies is an essential skill for designing and developing systems to support

them.

Database systems continue to demand more complex data structures and

interfaces, as applications get increasingly sophisticated. Most organisations collect

and store large volumes of data, either on their own systems or in the cloud, and

this data is used not just for the operational running of their business but also

mined for other more intelligent and complex applications. Databases stand as the

back-end of most systems used by organisations for their operations.

Database design and development is a fundamental and highly beneficial skill for

computing students to master, regardless of their specialism.

The aim of this unit is to give students opportunities to develop an understanding of

the concepts and issues relating to database design and development, as well as to

provide the practical skills to translate that understanding into the design and

creation of complex databases.

Topics included in this unit are: examination of different design tools and

techniques; examination of different development software options; considering the

development features of a fully functional robust solution covering data integrity,

data validation, data consistency, data security and advanced database querying

facilities across multiple tables; appropriate user interfaces for databases and for

other externally linked systems; creating complex reports/dashboards, testing the

system against the user and system requirements; and elements of complete

system documentation.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to use appropriate tools

to design and develop a relational database system for a substantial problem. They

will be able to test the system to ensure it meets user and system requirements

and fully document the system by providing technical and user documentation. For

practical purposes, this unit covers relational databases and related tools and

techniques. A brief overview of object-oriented databases will also be covered.

Students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking,

analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment

and developing academic competence.